Showing 44 results

People and organizations
Region of Peel Archives

Humberdale Rebekah Lodge, No. 163, Bolton

  • CA : RPA
  • Corporate body
  • 1911 - 2014

Bolton's Humberdale Rebekah Lodge, No. 163 was granted a constitution on August 11, 1916, and ceased operation in 2014. The Daughters of Rebekah, also known as the Rebekahs, or the International Association of Rebekah Assemblies, is an international service-orientated organization and a branch of the Independent Order of Oddfellows (IOOF).

IOOF is a fraternal society which provides insurance services to its members and also acts as a social organization. It originated in Great Britain, with the first Canadian Lodge opening in Montreal in 1843. In 1855 the Grand Lodge of Canada West was formed, which eventually became the Grand Lodge of Ontario. In 1868 the Grand Lodge allowed the formation of Rebekah lodges for female members of the order.

The objects and purposes of the Rebekah lodges, as of 1916, were declared to be as follows:

  • First: To visit and care for the sick; to relieve the distressed; to bury the dead; and in every way to assist their own members, and to assist Subordinate and sister Rebekah Lodges in kindly ministrations to the families of Odd Fellows when in trouble, sickness or want.
  • Second: To aid in the establishment and maintenance of homes for aged and indigent Odd Fellows and their wives and for the widows of deceased Odd Fellows; and homes for the care, education and support of orphans of deceased Odd Fellows and of deceased sisters of the Rebekah Degree.
  • Third: To cultivate and extend the social and fraternal relations of life among Lodges and the families of Odd Fellows.

Although initially designed as a female auxiliary of the IOOF, Rebekah Lodges now allow both female and male members.

Helen Wilson Public School

  • CA : RPA
  • Corporate body
  • 1959 -

Students moved into the school 14 December 1959, and the school officially opened 5 April 1960

Lagerquist, Bob, - 1999

  • CA : RPA
  • Person
  • - 1999

He married Jeanne in 1942.

He is the namesake of Robert H. Lagerquist Senior Public School, Brampton.

Sons of Temperance of North America. Summerville Division No. 298

  • CA
  • Corporate body
  • 10 Jan. 1890 - [after 20 Apr. 1894]

The Sons of Temperance was a men's brotherhood organization, promoting the temperance movement. New Brothers had to be nominated by the existing membership, and three other Brothers would investigate the nominee's life. The movement was founded in 1842, but the foundation and cessation of this chapter is unknown. Membership included William and Robert Pallett, of the fruit growing family.

Elsewhere in Toronto Township, nearby Burnhamthorpe had a hall on the southwest corner of what now is Dixie Rd and Burnhamthorpe Rd, from 1840 - 1874. The building was used for other purposes until 1927.

Central Public School (Brampton)

  • CA
  • Corporate body
  • 1856 - 1983

Successor to a rough cast school on Chapel Street, the Alexander Street facility is known to have been open by 1856. Originally housing both elementary and secondary level students, Central Public and Grammar School became Central Public School in 1877, after the construction of Brampton High School. Even with the opening of additional schools, the facility repeatedly needs expansions to deal with overcrowding; the present structure dates to 1916. The school closed in the 1980s, was condemned, and then turned into a parks and recreation facility.

A variety of the mid-20th century public schools that replaced the site (Beatty-Fleming, Helen Wilson, and Agnes Taylor) were named for teachers from the facility. W. J. Fenton was also among the teaching staff.

Halton-Peel Holstein Club

  • CA
  • Corporate body
  • 18 Sep. 1884 -

Halton-Peel Holstein Club, formerly Peel Holstein Club, operates out of the West-Central Ontario district of the Ontario Holstein Branch, the provinical link of the Holstein Association of Canada. The national entity was formed in 1884, the provinicial entity in 1981.

The groups' activities include the Halton-Peel Holstein Show, held during the Brampton Fall Fair, and social events for members.

Peel farmers were prominent in the breeding of Holsteins. The Holstein Association of Canada (now Holstein Canada) has had four national presidents from Peel: D. E. Smith, 1888-1889, Jack Fraser, 1948, Doug Dunton, 1962, and Howard Laidlaw, 1975. Local branch past-presidents include Town of Caledon Mayor Allan Thompson.

As of 1989, the group had members whose postal delivery was for routes in Georgetown, Norval, Orangeville, and Terra Cotta.

Kennedy, Robert Douglas, 1916-2003

  • CA
  • Person
  • 1916 - 2003

Robert Douglas Kennedy was born in 1916 at Cooksville, Ontario and was raised on a farm in Dixie as part of a family of ten children. As a child he attended Burnhamthorpe Public School and then Port Credit High School. In 1935 Kennedy went to the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph, he majored in animal husbandry and graduated in 1939 with a B.S.A.

After graduation Kennedy joined the Canadian Army and fought for four and a half years during World War II, eventually achieving the rank of Captain in the Canada and Northwest Pacific Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps.

Following the war Kennedy worked for twelve years with the Department of Veteran’s Affairs helping to settle veterans and their families. After this he worked for two years with the Farm Credit Corporation, the successor to the Canadian Farm Loan Board, from which he resigned in 1967 in order to seek provincial nomination. He also served on the South Peel Board of Education from 1955 to 1963, including two years as Chairman. He also served on the Toronto Township Hydro Commission from 1963 to 1967, one year as Chairman.

In 1967 Kennedy was first elected to the Ontario Legislature, and was later re-elected in 1971, 1975, 1977 and 1981. During these years he served on numerous Standing and Selection Committees. As a Member of Provincial Parliament, Kennedy introduced a number of important Private Bills, including bills:

  • for the mandatory use of seatbelts.
  • for the protection if personal privacy.
  • to provide residents of mobile home the right to vote for Boards and Commissions.
  • to compensate victims of crime.
  • to provide parking facilities for physically handicapped persons.
  • to establish an Arbour Day.
  • to amend the Expropriation Act.

As well, Kennedy introduced the following major resolutions within Parliament:

  • to ban the non-returnable bottle.
  • to control right of entry to private property.
  • to provide protection for travellers.

Kennedy was appointed Government Whip in 1971; Chief Government Whip in 1972; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Education in 1976; and Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Inter- governmental Affairs in 1981.

Kennedy’s other afflictions include being a member of the Agricultural and Appraisal Institutes of Canada; past Executive and member of the Cooksville Royal Canadian Legion; former Executive and coach of the Toronto Township Hockey League; and former member of the Committee of Aging, Social Planning Council of Peel.

In the mid 1970s, Kennedy kept in touch with his constituents through a weekly newspaper column. He also occasionally hosted a short radio talk-show on a local station.
In 1940 Kennedy married Kathleen Helen Krafft of Cayuga, Ont. and the two had four children: Sue, John, Pat and Janet. A notable relative of Kennedy’s was Col. Thomas Laird Kennedy, who represented Peel County at Queen’s Park for all but three years between 1919 and 1959, much of this time as Minister of Agriculture. In 1949 he served as Premier of Ontario for seven months.

Frost, Richard L.

  • CA
  • Person
  • born 20th century

Frost was the Chief Administrative Officer of the Regional Municipality of Peel (1978-1989).

Matthews, Robertson, 1880 - 1972

  • CA
  • Person
  • 1880 - 1972

Robertson Matthews was born in 1880 in Yorkville, son of Reverend Matthew Henry Matthews and his second wife Naomi Dodds. Mechanically inclined as a young man, Matthews trained at the Williams Machinery Plant, where he developed a lifelong interest in engines and mechanical inventions. Matthews travelled extensively in his youth in British Columbia, Australia, and England. After attending Allegeny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania (1902-1903), he continued on to Cornell University in Ithaca, New York to complete his Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering. In 1908, Matthews joined the Faculty of Engineering at Cornell, later becoming a full Professor. In 1913, he married Ethel Dodds. He left Cornell in 1917 to join the U.S. Government at Wilmington, Delaware, until 1921 when he became an advisor on the internal combustion engine at Langley Field, Virginia. In 1924, Matthews joined the Edison Company in Detroit to work on developments in electric heating. Matthews returned to Bolton in 1931 to care for his mother and to convalesce following a serious automobile accident. During the next forty years, Matthews experimented with hydroponics, kept daily diaries, and wrote regularly to local and American newspapers and contributed essays on technical aspects to periodicals. He published a work of short fiction entitled "His Lost Chord: glimpses of man's deepest emotion in restraint" in 1959. After Ethel's death in 1958, Matthews lived alone until 1967 when he moved into Peel Manor Home for the Aged, where he died on March 3, 1972 at the age of 92.

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