Showing 594 results

People and organizations
Family

Heit (family)

  • 015
  • Family
  • 1939 - present (in Sudbury, ON)

The Heit family first moved to the Garson, Ontario area shortly after Jacob "Jack" Heit (1914-1999) married Katherine "Kay" Kraft (1918-2009) on February 5, 1940 at Christ the King Church in Sudbury, Ontario. Prior to this time, both Jacob Heit and Katherine Kraft lived in Saskatchewan. The Heit's raised their family of five daughters, Diana, Janet, Marilyn, Kathy, and Susan in Garson, Ontario.

Kantokoski (Koski), Koivula & Korpela Family

  • 016
  • Family
  • 1924 - present (in Canada)

The Kantokoski (Koski), Koivula, and Korpela families originated from Finland, but many members immigrated to Sudbury and other parts of Canada and the United States. These families inter-married over the years and have many shared descendants who settled in Sudbury.

Querney Family

  • 018
  • Family
  • 1937-present (in Sudbury, Ontario)

The Querney family first came to Sudbury, Ontario in 1937 from Toronto, Ontario due to Ernest T. Querney's new position as Manager of the Northern Electric Company Limited. Ernest & Marjorie Querney's son Alan Querney was born November 3, 1929 in Toronto. After growing up in Sudbury, Querney graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1954 with an Honors degree in Business Administration. In 1957, he became a Chartered Accountant and in November of that same year, Querney began working in the lumber industry at WB Plaunt & Son Limited/Austin Lumber (Dalton) Limited. Querney married Shirley Richmond in London, Ontario in 1954. They had four children, Tom, John, Susan and William [Bill].

In 1972, Bill Muirhead, a family friend, sold his family's business (Muirhead Stationers Limited) to Querney. After Alan Querney's sons graduated university, they became co-owners of the business as well. Tom Querney (trained in economics, Chartered Accountant) became the general manager, Bill Querney (McMaster, Commerce Degree) the furniture warehouse manager, and John Querney (Laurentian, Commerce Degree) the sales manager of the office furniture section.

Alan Querney was very active in the community. Querney was a member of the Laurentian University Board (Chairman, 1987-1990), the Board of Regents at Huntington College (Chairman), the Sudbury and District Chamber of Commerce, the Sudbury and District Chartered Accountants Association, the Sudbury Algoma Sanitarium (Secretary-Treasurer), the Sudbury and District Hospital Council (Chairman), Idylwylde Golf and Country Club (President), the Ontario Lumber Manufacturer's Association, St. Andrew's United Church Council and Finance Committee, and a member of the Board and Treasurer of St. Andrew's Place Inc. Querney received numerous awards in the community including becoming an Honourary Fellow of Huntington University (1977), receiving an Honourary degree of Doctor of Sacred Letters from Huntington University (1982), elected a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario (FCA, 1985), awarded the Commemorative Medal for the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada (circa 1992), receiving an Honourary Degree of Doctor of Business Administration from Laurentian University (1996), received the President's Award from the Sudbury and District Chamber of Commerce (along with his sons, 1998), and elected a Life Member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario (1999). He was also recognized as a Paul Harris Fellow by the Rotary Club of Sudbury in 2000 for charitable contributions. Alan Querney retired around 2002 and Tom Querney became President of Muirheads.

In May 2005, the Querney family sold Muirheads to Grand & Toy, an OfficeMax company. They became the largest commercial office products company in Northern Ontario.

In 2009, John and Bill Querney decided to leave Grand & Toy and start their own office supply business. Querney's Office Plus opened to the public at 67 Elm Street (right beside the former location of Muirheads), Sudbury, Ontario on July 19, 2010 with the grand opening celebration on October 21, 2010.

Stevens Family

  • 021
  • Family
  • 1902 - present (in Canada)

Robert Thomas Stevens [Roberto Tomaso Stefanizzi] was born in Cellara, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy on February 23, 1896 to Gaetano Stefanizzi and Gaetana Caliguiri. At the age of 6, he immigrated to Canada with his uncle Francesco Steffanzzi (aka Frank Stevens d. 1941 age 70) in 1902 while the rest of his family remained in Italy.

As a teenager during the first world war, Stevens operated a commissary at Nobel for the explosives plant employees. Stevens enjoyed being an entrepreneur and in 1918, he decided to venture into the film industry by becoming the manager of the Regent Theatre at 23 Elm Street East in Sudbury. (By 1925, the Regent Theatre was located at 71-75 Elm Street East.) His theatre business thrived and over the years, Stevens expanded his business with the acquisition of additional theatres in Sturgeon Falls, Creighton Mine and Sault Ste. Marie. For a few years, Stevens also owned a theatre in Espanola.

On December 4, 1923, Robert Stevens married Florence Boucher, a nurse originally from Whitefish, Ontario. The ceremony was held in Little Current, Ontario. They had six children; Joseph 'Robert' Guy (1924-1968), 'William' Alfred (1926-1988), 'Thomas' Joseph, Anne Marie (1930-2004, married name Ripley), John, and Margaret Theressa.

During the second world war, Robert Stevens, along with many other Italian-born Canadians, was closely monitored by authorities. On August 24, 1940, Stevens was a patient at St. Joseph’s Hospital, suffering from a slight ailment. At 10 a.m. he was arrested on charges, under the Defence of Canada Regulations, for during August 14 to 20, 1940 “making statements intended to, or likely to, prejudice recruiting, training, discipline and administration of His Majesty’s forces,” and “making statements intended to, or likely to, cause disaffection to His Majesty.” He was escorted from his hospital room to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police headquarters for questioning. Afterwards, he was taken to the courthouse. Stevens was denied bail by the Magistrate and placed in a prison cell at the Sudbury District Jail until his trial three days later. Stevens plead guilty to the first charge and was fined $25. The second charge was dropped.

Robert Thomas Stevens became ill in January 1943 and passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital in Sudbury on February 13, 1943 at the age of 46.

Worthington (family)

  • 024
  • Family
  • 1823-1905

James Worthington was born October 30, 1823 to James Worthington (1795-1830) and Olivia Worthington (nee Corden, 1793-1829) in Wetley Rocks, Staffordshire, England. The third of five children, James Worthington was orphaned one month before his seventh birthday. He apprenticed as a stone mason and most likely immigrated to Canada with his brother John Worthington (1818-1873) in 1841.

On December 18, 1847, James Worthington married Hannah Shun (1824-1856) in the Home District in Ontario. They had two children, John Charles Worthington (1848-1889, born in Toronto, Ontario) and Louisa Worthington (later known as Louisa Harder, 1850-1936, born in Perth County, Ontario). In 1851, the Worthingtons were farmers, living in a log shanty in Blanchard, Perth County, Ontario. Hannah Shun Worthington died around 1856 and James Worthington married Caroline Frances Hitchcock (1832-1905) on March 16, 1859 in Toronto, Ontario.

Caroline Hitchcock was born August 19, 1832 to John Hitchcock (1805-1865) and Caroline Hitchcock (nee Wright, 1808-1890) in Ballingdon, Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The second daughter of at least ten children, she immigrated to Canada circa 1858, most likely with her sister Emily Sarah Hitchcock (1838-1896, married Carpenter John William Malcolm in Caledonia, Haldimand County, Ontario on April 16, 1859).

Around the time of his first wife's death (circa 1856), James Worthington became a partner in his brother, John Worthington’s contractor business in Toronto, Ontario. The firm Worthington Brothers employed over 350 workers and included stone-quarries in Ohio. Notable buildings constructed by Worthington Brothers include University College and the Chapel of St James the Less. The business also partnered with F.W. Cumberland to form the Toronto Patent Pressed Brick Company in Yorkville, Ontario.

By the early 1860’s, James Worthington, in addition to his duties as a building contractor, served as Captain of the No. 4 Company of the Tenth Battalion of Royal Regiment of Toronto Volunteers, retiring as a Major in 1869. His brother John Worthington left the Worthington Brothers’ business in 1860 to pursue business avenues with railway construction. In 1865, James Worthington partnered with his younger brother George Worthington to build forts for the military (Fort # 2 and Fort # 3) in Point Levy, Quebec. After the forts were completed in 1869, James Worthington followed his brother John’s example and left the Worthington Brothers to explore railway opportunities.

In 1871, the Worthingtons (James, Caroline and Louisa) were living in Trois Pistoles, Témiscouata, Quebec, along with Caroline’s sister Eliza Hitchcock (1839-1913, aka Elizabeth Hitchcock). John Charles Worthington was living with his wife and child in Fraserville, Temiscouata, Quebec at this time.

In 1874, James Worthington built “Worthington Block” in Toronto, Ontario. A three storey, six-bay building designed by architect William Storm. During that same year, on June 30, 1874, James Worthington was awarded custody of his niece, Annie Louisa Yates (1863-1957, married James Saunders June 25, 1881), daughter of iron-moulder Thomas Yates from the Township of Holland in County Grey, Ontario. Annie Yates’ mother, Olive Jane Worthington Yates, died three years previously and her father required assistance with her care. Annie Yates lived with the Worthingtons in Quebec most likely until her marriage to James Saunders in 1881.

On July 1, 1878, the Canadian Central Railway Syndicate began its lease of the Windsor Hotel, with James Worthington as its President. In 1879, James Worthington purchased control of the Canada Central Railway with Duncan McIntyre. By February 1880, he declared bankruptcy and sold his Canada Central Railway interest to settle his debts.

In 1881, James and Caroline Worthington resided in Brockville, Ontario with Caroline’s sister Eliza Hitchcock Mondelet (married Dr. William Mondelet October 25, 1876, filed for divorce in 1877). In 1883, James Worthington worked as the Construction Superintendent for the Canadian Pacific Railway. His position included the responsibility of establishing railway stations across Northern Ontario from Pembroke to Pogamasing Lake. In mid February 1883, Worthington named one of the new railway stations “Sudbury” after his wife’s hometown in England.

The Sudbury Post Office was established on April 1, 1883. James Worthington served as Postmaster at the Sudbury Post Office until he resigned March 4, 1884. In May 1884, James Worthington had a disagreement with William Van Horne and retired at the age of 61 from the Canadian Pacific Railway.

During his time in Northern Ontario, Worthington invested in the mining industry. In 1889, one of the mines James Worthington heavily invested in was named after him (Worthington Mine) and eventually the town which grew around it became known as Worthington, Ontario.

In 1889, James Worthington purchased the Ontario Bolt Works Company in Swansea, Ontario. That same year, he also was appointed to another position with the Post Office of Canada, serving as the Postmaster for the Toronto-Swansea Substation Post Office from September 1, 1889 to December 17, 1897.

During the 1890's, the Worthingtons resided in Toronto, Ontario (St. Patricks Ward) where they both remained for the rest of their lives. James Worthington died November 24, 1898 at the age of 75 while Caroline Worthington died February 20, 1905 at the age of 72. The Worthingtons are interred at St. James Cemetery in Toronto, Ontario.

Orgill (family)

  • 11-008
  • Family
  • ca. 1888-1910

The Orgill family is a branch of the Boyd family of Bobcaygeon, Ontario. Mrs. Norma Orgill, the donor of the collection, is the wife of Herbert Orgill, a descendant of William (Willie) Thornton Cust Boyd (1859-1919). Willie was the son of the lumbering entrepreneur Mossom Boyd (1815-1883).

Nill (family)

  • 12-011
  • Family
  • 1886?-1940?

Daniel Nill was a farmer who at one time owned the property at 1202 Morton Line in Cavan, Ontario. The fonds consists of items which were found on the property in 2001; they relate to Nill and to members of the Mason family.

Theodore Thorne Hamilton (family)

  • 13-003
  • Family
  • 1890-1959

The Theodore Thorne Hamilton family is associated with the earliest settlement of the Bobcaygeon area and later relocation to western Canada, where Theodore Thorne Hamilton was a telegraph operator with the Canadian National Railway. Hamilton was born 10 April 1890 in Bobcaygeon and died 3 August 1959. While in western Canada, he resided in Eudako, British Columbia.

Collins Gammon (family)

  • 13-008
  • Family
  • 20th-21st century

The Collins and Gammon families are descendents of Thomas Alexander Stewart and Frances Stewart, Irish immigrants who arrived in the Peterborough area in 1822.

Wallis (family)

  • 14-001
  • Family
  • 1774-1895

(Biographical information copied from Trent University Archives newsletter "Archives News", Issue Number 48, January 2014: "The Wallis Family" by Janice Millard).

"The link between the two [Wallis family and Forbes family] is Louisa Forbes who became Mrs. James Wallis. Louisa was the mother of well-known Peterborough-born artist and sculptor Katherine Wallis and Louisa’s father was Capt. Robert Miller/Millar Forbes.

Capt. Robert Miller Forbes had a distinguished career in the British Navy. It was, however, marred by an incident in 1798. Robert caused his ship commander, Capt. Lord Henry Paulet, later Earl St. Vincent, to be court martialed. Paulet apparently struck the then Lieutenant Forbes while Forbes was on duty on their ship – the Thalia. Paulet lost the case - but soon after he was given clemency, re-instated, and in 1819 became a Vice-Admiral. Robert Miller did not fare as well. In a transcribed letter he says that “he became the object of the most cruel and vindictive persecution… that has proved a barrier to his professional progress thro’ the mis-representations of that distinguished officer.”

After the Napoleonic Wars Robert Forbes, along with a number of ex-British military personnel, took their families and settled in France. Robert’s first child, Louisa, was born in Avranches, France. There is a watercolour in our new donation of the Church where Louisa was christened. It is likely by Katherine Wallis. The Forbes family moved around in Europe and sons were born in St. Servan Sur Merin Brittany, France. Finally the family moved to Peterborough.

Robert Forbes had an even more well-known brother – Charles John Forbes. Charles was in both the British Navy and the British Army. While in the Navy, Charles was present at the Battle of the Nile (also called the Battle of Aboukir) where Nelson defeated the French Navy. Another person at Aboukir was Charles Rubidge. Perhaps Charles Forbes and Charles Rubidge reminisced together about old battles.

While in the British Army, Charles Forbes was present for the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Our donation contains a letter written 29 Jan. 1815 on board H.M.S. Alceste, off Cat Island (near New Orleans), and sent to James Cobb, Secretary, East India Company (a cousin). In the letter Charles says that the information given to the Admiral was “fallacious” and that unlike what they had been led to believe, no “settlers of Louisiana and the Floridas” flocked to join the British cause and hence they had insufficient troops for the encounter with the Americans. It’s interesting to note that even by the end of January, Charles did not know that a treaty to end the War had been signed.

Charles had two separate enlistment periods with the British Army. Like his brother, he retired when the Napoleonic Wars were over and lived in Europe, but a few years later he re-enlisted in the Army. In 1824 he worked for the Commissariat in Nova Scotia and in 1825 he went to Montreal and stayed for 8 years. He was then posted to Jamaica and, like many Europeans who lived in the tropics, became ill. He briefly to went to England and then finally retired at half pay back in Quebec.

While posted in Quebec he acted as Commissary General for the Army and ensured there were supplies for the engineers and workers who were building canals in the Montreal region. While he was there he purchased land in the village of Carillon, on the Ottawa River just south of Lachute, Quebec, in what is now the Argenteuil Region of Quebec.

There he built a wonderful house called “Bellevue”. In our newly acquired scrapbook of Louisa Forbes there is a sketch of that house. Charles was known far and wide for his hospitality and many important people would visit him – including the Governors General.

Another well-known owner of land in the area was Sidney Robert Bellingham - nephew of Thomas A. Stewart. Sidney was very interested in politics and played a role in the 1837 rebellion – as did the British veteran Charles John Forbes."

Atwood (family)

  • 14-011
  • Family
  • 1858-1931

The Atwood family is associated with nineteenth-century settlement in the Lakefield, Ontario region. James Parr Clinton Atwood (1836-1912) immigrated to Canada from Gloucestershire in 1855 and married Anne Traill Fotheringhame (Annie) Traill (1838-1931), daughter of Thomas Traill and Catharine Parr Traill, in 1858. Together they had seven children: Henry, Emily, Clinton, Katharine, George, Anne, and Florence. The Atwood family is related to the Upper Canada pioneer Traill, Moodie, and Strickland families.

Standen-McQueen (family)

  • 14-014
  • Family
  • ca. 1850-ca. 1970

Sydney (Sid) Helmer Standen was born in 1905 in Minesing, Ontario, the son of Andrew Ronald and Ada Louisa Standen. In 1911, his family moved to Kindersley, Saskatchewan where Sid was later to become a teacher; he also served in World War II.

Euphemia (Effie) Young McQueen was born in 1903 in London, England, daughter of James and Margaret McQueen (nee Drysdale). In Effie’s first year, the McQueens moved to Scotland and then, in 1913, to Canada, where they settled eventually in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Effie became a teacher and appeared in theatrical performances and recitations.

Sid and Effie married in 1930 and settled in Hanley, Saskatchewan. They had four sons: Philip Andrew, Neil McQueen, Sydney Drysdale (Dale), and Eric James William; Philip died in 1955 at the age of 22 during a tactical flight training exercise near Chatham, New Brunswick. In 1942, Sid and Effie moved to Burnaby, British Columbia where they were to spend the remainder of their lives. After Effie’s death in 1965, Sid married Gladys Marshall; he died in 1975. (Taken from “Standens and McQueens: A Canadian Story of Migrant Families” by S. Dale Standen, 2014).

Allen - Bellamy family

  • 14-016
  • Family
  • 1918-2007

Kenneth Charles Bellamy was born in 1919 in Cramahe Township, Northumberland County, the youngest son of Charles and Olive Bellamy (nee Bland). The Charles Bellamy family lived in the Smithfield/Brighton, Ontario area. Charles owned a farm in Salem, Ontario in his later years and in his younger years, worked for the Grand Trunk Railway as a brakeman. In 1938, Ken joined the Canadian Armed Forces and served overseas in World War II with the Midland Regiment, Hastings Prince Edward Regiment and the Essex Scottish regiment. Upon returning home, he married Ruth Catherine Allen. Over his career, he worked on the family farm, for the Department of Highways, and with Marbon Chemical Corporation in Cobourg, Ontario.
Ruth Catherine Allen was born in 1918 in Cramahe Township, the daughter of Durwood and Beatrice Allen (nee Hennessey). The Durwood Allen family lived on a farm in the Castleton, Ontario area. Ruth attended Peterborough Normal School in 1938 attaining her Teachers Certificate. During the course of her teaching career she taught in Morganston, Frankford, Napanee and South Cramahe Public Schools.
Ruth and Kenneth married 30 June 1947 in Brighton, Ontario. They had two daughters, Mary Margaret and Kathryn Ann, and lived in the community of Salem. After Ruth’s death in 1979, Ken married Joyce Blakley. Joyce died in 1985 and Ken in 2007. (Taken from information supplied by the donor).

Stalker-Magee Family

  • 2015.10
  • Family
  • 1910-1994

George Roland Stalker (July 10 1910-Nov. 28 1994) was born in Waskada, Manitoba to parents James Benjamin Stalker (b. 1877) and Alma Lavinia Stalker nee Meggison. Jim, Alma, and their three children, George, Reginald, and Lois, left prairie homesteading during the Great Depression, moving to Burnaby, British Columbia for a brief time and later to Ontario, where Jim would work as head wood carver at Gibbard’s Furniture Factory in Napanee. Alma was a dressmaker and supplemented their income further by operating a tea room in Napanee. George Roland and his siblings attended Napanee District Collegiate Institute, Lois becoming editor of the school yearbook, The Torch. In 1928, Roland returned to his uncle George Meggison’s farm in Waskada for work. After his father’s death in 1932, Roland returned to Napanee, working as Assistant Foreman with Gibbard’s Furniture Factory in their finishing and shipping department. From 1935 through 1940 Roland and his brother Reginald rented farms in Selby and then Hay Bay. In 1940, they began renting The Grange, a 150 acre clergy reserve farm in Adolphustown, eventually purchasing the property in 1945.
George Roland Stalker married Muriel Grace Magee (Jan. 12 1918-May 7 1994) of Hay Bay on February 21st 1941, daughter of Robert James Magee and Cora Deborah Magee nee White. Together, Roland and Grace lived on the farm in Adolphustown, where they practiced mixed farming. Roland worked at the Alcan plant in Kingston for a time, to supplement the family’s income. Together they had six children, Moria Anne (b. June 4 1942), Muriel Aileen (b. Oct. 10 1944), Alma Joyce (b. Mar. 20, 1948), Deborah Grace (b. Nov. 22 1955), James Alec (b. Apr. 13 1957), and Kevin Andrew (b. Feb. 1 1959). Grace and Roland Stalker ran a broiler poultry business in the 1950’s, until selling their farm in 1958 and moving to Sandhurst to live with Grace’s parents, Bert and Cora Magee. Roland worked as Inspector of Sewer Installations with Public Utilities Commission in Kitimat from 1956-57, and then became an independent contractor, building three homes in South Fredericksburgh while also working as Sale Manager for Ideal Barn Cleaners, a Quebec based company, from 1959-1963. In 1963, Roland built a bungalow for him and his family in South Fredericksburgh and built and operated a 200,000 laying hen poultry business from their home, expanding the farm in the following years to include crops and Hereford cattle. Upon retirement in 1975, Grace and Roland sold their farm and built another home on a nearby lot purchased from their daughter Anne and husband Darryl MacDermaid. Grace and Roland were active community members throughout their lives, involved in Farm Radio Forum, the South Fredericksburgh Community Club, The Christian Neighbourhood newspaper (Grace was a regular contributor), Adolphustown United Chuch, United Church Women, Adolphustown Women’s Institute, 4-H, and the Lennox and Addington branch of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA), of which Grace was president. Grace later became vice-president at the provincial level of the OFA. She also ran for political office in 1974, as the federal Liberal Party candidate for Frontenac-Lennox & Addington. The couple had an active retirement as well, volunteering in Sierra Leone as part of a hatchery farm program sponsored by the OFA and World University Service of Canada, and travelling across Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. Grace and Roland lived out their final years together on Galiano Island, B.C.

Albright and Kelly family

  • AFC 141
  • Family
  • 1883-1979

Frederick Stanley Albright was born on March 23, 1883 in Haldimand County, Ontario, the son of Reverend Josiah and Sarah (née Moyer) Albright. Raised in Beamsville, Ontario, Albright attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in political science in 1908. While at Victoria College, Albright was the editor of the student newspaper, Acta Victoriana. Albright moved to Calgary in 1912 and was admitted to practice law through the Law Society of Alberta. Albright joined the firm of Clark, McCarthy, Carson and MacLeod and lectured in the Faculty of Law at the University of Alberta. Elnora Evelyn Kelly was born on November 14, 1889 in Cayuga, Ontario, the daughter of Reverend S. Judson and Elizabeth (née Slaght) Kelly. In 1912, Evelyn received her BA in English and History from Victoria College at the University of Toronto. Evelyn Kelly and Frederick Albright were married on June 12, 1914 in Thorold, Ontario; they returned to Calgary shortly afterwards. Frederick Albright enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in June, 1916 and initially worked as a recruiter in Calgary. He was sent for training to Bramshott Camp in England in March, 1917 before being sent to action in France. Frederick Albright was killed in action on October 26, 1917 at Passchendaele, Belgium. He isburied at Larch Wood Cemetery in Zillebeke, Belgium.During Frederick's military service and after his death, Evelyn earned a law degree, becoming the second female lawyer in Alberta. Evelyn Albright returned to Ontario in 1920 and joined the University of Western Ontario's Faculty of Arts. She became the first female instructor in the English department and was promoted to assistant professor in 1930. Leaving London in 1931 for the University of Chicago, she was awarded her Master of Arts degree. Evelyn returned to Londonand became an associate professor at the University of Western Ontario in 1935. Evelyn was appointed convener of the Committee on Laws for Women and Children for the Local Council of Women in London. She was also president of the University Women's Club. Albright retired in 1951 but remained active in the University of Western Ontario's Alumni Association. Evelyn Albright died on April 24, 1979. She is buried at Greenwood Cemetery in Norfolk County, Ontario.

Mahler Rosé Families

  • AFC 382
  • Family
  • [18-?-]

The Mahler family includes the children of Bernard and Marie Mahler, their spouses, and their children. The children of Bernard and Marie include: Isidor, Gustav, Ernst, Leopoldine, Karl, Rudolf, Alois (Louis), Justine (Ernestine), Arnold, Friedrich (Fritz), Alfred, Emma Marie Eleanor, and Konrad Mahler. Most notably, Gustav Mahler, was the eldest surviving Mahler sibling and was also a famed conductor and composer in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Rosé family includes the children of Herman and Maria Rosé, their spouses, and their children. The children of Herman and Maria include: Alexander, Eduard, Arnold Josef, and Berthold Rosé. Both Alexander and Arnold were members of the well-known 19th and 20th century musical ensemble, The Rosé Quartet.

Several relationships and marriages connected these families. Gustav Mahler and Arnold Rosé were musical contemporaries and friends. In 1898, Emma Marie Eleanor Mahler married Eduard Rosé. And in 1902, Justine Mahler married Arnold Josef Rosé. As a result of Justine and Arnold's union, they had two children. Their eldest child was named Alfred Rosé. Alfred Rosé established himself as a musician, musical therapist, professor, and composer. He eventually immigrated to London, Ontario in 1948. The connections between the Mahler and Rosé families resulted in the records, files, letters, photographs, memorabilia, and artifacts that make up The Gustav Mahler Alfred Rosé Collection.

For more information on The Gustav Mahler-Alfred Rosé Collection see "The Gustav Mahler-Alfred Rosé Collection: An Inventory" and "The Mahler Family Letters" by Stephen McClatchie.

Goldie (family)

  • C4
  • Family
  • 1824 - [194-?]

The Goldie family members were prominent mill owners, citizens and politicians in Guelph. James Goldie (1824-1912) and his wife, Frances Owen (1824-1908) and young son Thomas (1850-1892), moved to Guelph in 1850 from Utica, New York, where James had learned the milling trade. After his arrival in Guelph, James Goldie bought and rebuilt two mills in the area. In 1860, he purchased a barrel and stave factory, located on present-day Speedvale Avenue by the Speed River. On this site, he built a flour mill and a new house for his family. In 1866, he also purchased the burned out remains and land of the People's Mill on Cardigan Street by the river. When this mill was rebuilt, he sold the Speedvale mill to John Pipe in 1867-1868. The family then moved into a house on Cardigan Street. By this time, James and Frances Goldie had four more sons, named John (1852-1904), James Owen (1854-1922), Roswell (1862-1931) and Lincoln (1894-1931).

Like his father, Thomas Goldie became a well educated man, having studied at the Wellington District Grammar School, McGill University in Montreal, and the Eastman National Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. He also gained valuable business experience while working in Milwaukee and Montreal.

In 1876, Thomas Goldie married Emma J. Mitchell (1853-1940). She and Thomas lived in the house known as Rosehurst, originally built for Dr. William Clarke. Thomas and Emma had five children: Frances (1879- ), Ruth (1881- ), Thomas Leon (1882-1916), Roswell Thompson (1887- ) and Emma Gwendolyn (1890- ).

Thomas Goldie became the manager of his father's mill and acted as president, while his brothers, James Owen and Roswell, were vice-president and secretary of the company respectively. During these years, the mill continued to flourish with the addition of railway spur lines built in 1881 and 1888.

Thomas Goldie became involved in local politics and was elected as an alderman for the St. David's Ward in 1881, 1883, 1884, and 1885-1890, serving on various committees and boards.

Thomas also served as a high school trustee, from 1882 to 1884, and was an active leader of the Wellington Conservative Association, especially in Guelph. For nine years, he also served as the Chairman of the Board of Managers of Knox Church in Guelph.

In 1891, Thomas Goldie was elected mayor of Guelph and proceeded with an ambitious campaign of public works improvments, including the waterworks and distribution system, electrical delivery system, and construction of permanent sidewalks. He was also responsible for the hiring of Guelph's first City Engineer to manage these local improvement projects. Thomas was re-elected mayor in January, 1892. He died on February 4, 1892, the second of Guelph's mayors to die while in office.

For more historical information on the Goldie family, please see B.M. Durtnell's article: Guelph's Beloved Mayor. The article can be found in the Guelph Historical Society's publication, Historic Guelph, volume XXIX, September 1990, p. 4-15.

Goldie family collection

  • C4
  • Family
  • ca. 1845-ca. 1970]

The Goldie family were prominent mill owners, citizens and politicians in Guelph. James Goldie (1824-1912) and his wife, Frances Owen (1824-1908) and young son Thomas (1850-1892), moved to Guelph in 1850 from Utica, New York, where James had learned the milling trade. After his arrival in Guelph, James Goldie bought and rebuilt two mills in the area. In 1860, he purchased a barrel and stave factory, located on present-day Speedvale Avenue by the Speed River. On this site, he built a flour mill and a new house for his family. In 1866, he also purchased the burned out remains and land of the People's Mill on Cardigan Street by the river. When this mill was rebuilt, he sold the Speedvale mill to John Pipe in 1867-1868. The family then moved into a house on Cardigan Street. By this time, James and Frances Goldie had four more sons, named John (1852-1904), James Owen (1854-1922), Roswell (1862-1931) and Lincoln (1894-1931).
Like his father, Thomas Goldie became a well educated man, having studied at the Wellington District Grammar School, McGill University in Montreal, and the Eastman National Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. He also gained valuable business experience while working in Milwaukee and Montreal.

In 1876, Thomas Goldie married Emma J. Mitchell (1853-1940). She and Thomas lived in the house known as Rosehurst, originally built for Dr. William Clarke. Thomas and Emma had five children: Frances (1879- ), Ruth (1881- ), Thomas Leon (1882-1916), Roswell Thompson (1887- ) and Emma Gwendolyn (1890- ).

Thomas Goldie became the manager of his father's mill and acted as president, while his brothers, James Owen and Roswell, were vice-president and secretary of the company respectively. During these years, the mill continued to flourish with the addition of railway spur lines built in 1881 and 1888.

Thomas Goldie became involved in local politics and was elected as an alderman for the St. David's Ward in 1881, 1883, 1884, and 1885-1890, serving on various committees and boards.

Thomas also served as a high school trustee, from 1882 to 1884, and was an active leader of the Wellington Conservative Association, especially in Guelph. For nine years, he also served as the Chairman of the Board of Managers of Knox Church in Guelph.

In 1891, Thomas Goldie was elected mayor of Guelph and proceeded with an ambitious campaign of public works improvments, including the waterworks and distribution system, electrical delivery system, and construction of permanent sidewalks. He was also responsible for the hiring of Guelph's first City Engineer to manage these local improvement projects. Thomas was re-elected mayor in January, 1892. He died on February 4, 1892, the second of Guelph's mayors to die while in office.

For more historical information on the Goldie family, please see B.M. Durtnell's article: Guelph's Beloved Mayor. The article can be found in the Guelph Historical Society's publication, Historic Guelph, volume XXIX, September 1990, p. 4-15.

Results 1 to 20 of 594