Showing 19758 results

People and organizations

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The Warren Park Ratepayers' Association (WPRA) began in 1924 to further the interests of the community of Warren Park within the Township of York. Over its history, the WPRA acted as the political vehicle for the community on issues of local interest. These tended to relate to commercial and residential development plans, zoning issues, parking, garbage collection, public transportation, and public education.The WPRA also served a social function, organising community celebrations and events, as well as community fund raising for many local initiatives and helping neighbours in need.

In the beginning, the WPRA had a small assembly hall located at 2 Crosby Avenue, across from Warren Park Public School. Over the years, the building has undergone a number of renovations and now functions as a private residence.

One of their major victories was the creation of the 55 Warren Park TTC bus service, providing greater mobility to residents in the Warren Park valley. The Warren Park route started as a summer-only service in 1989, before being expanded to year-round service the following year.

The WPRA is a volunteer run organization, with executive positions annually elected by the membership. Membership primarily entailed voting rights at meetings. While the WPRA did have membership fees at one time, membership was later extended to all residents. It was a member of the York Federation of Ratepayers until the federation disbanded after the amalgamation of the City of York with the City of Toronto in 1998.

The WPRA has been largely dormant since the mid-2010s, with its remaining financial assets being donated to Heritage York in 2017. It continues to exist in a very limited capacity, primarily serving as point of contact for government with Warren Park residents, and a voice of the neighbourhood should a formal organization be needed by local government.

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Charlotte Irvine is a descendent of Frederick Aiken Howland; brother of William Pearce Howland, Father of Confederation and second Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. Frederick and his business partner, Thomas Elliot, were the owners of the Howland & Elliott General Store and Mill Office in Lambton Mills.

Irvine has conducted extensive genealogical research on the Howland and Ford names. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack

  • 027
  • Corporate body
  • 1948 - After 1962

Robert Baden-Powell's book, Scouting for Boys, was first published in England in 1908. Shortly after, Scouts began forming all over Canada. In 1910, a Dominion Council was established and Governor General Earl Grey accepted the position of Chief Scout for Canada. The Boy Scouts Association was incorporated in the United Kingdom two years later. In June 1914, a Canadian branch of that organization - The Canadian General Council of the Boy Scouts Association - was incorporated. In 1920, the International Conference, to which all recognized Boy Scout associations belonged, was formed.

The first meeting of the 1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack, which was part of the Coniston Boy Scout Association was in October 1948. This 1st troop was affiliated with the All Saints Anglican Church and, in late 1948, a 2nd troop was formed which was affiliated with the Catholic Church (the French speaking boys attended Our Lady of Mercy Church while the English speaking boys attended St. Paul's Church). Both troops existed at the same time in Coniston and frequently participated in events and fundraising together. The 1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack held their troop meetings on Tuesday nights, but they would have events, such as tobogganing parties and parades, on other days of the week. Regular activities of the troop included camping, hiking, first aid training, hockey, watching National Film Board movies, and father & son banquets. The troop was funded through various fundraising activities, such as candy sales on Valentine's Day.

In September 1956, the 1st Coniston Troop approached the 2nd Troop with the proposition of forming one group for Coniston. Bishop Dignan gave permission for boys from the 1st Troop to join, provided the 2nd Troop had control of the troop. During 1956 and 1957, the 2nd troop had difficulties recruiting Cub Masters who had the time to volunteer and the group folded by 1958 with the remainder of their bank balance being donated to the 1st Coniston Group Committee on November 12, 1962.

Presidents (Chairmen) listed in the scrapbook were:
Roy Snitch (1948 - 1949)
J. Rogerson (1952 - 1953)

25 Year Club

  • Corporate body

The 25 Year Club was a social club for employees of the United Church of Canada with twenty-five years of service. It was created circa 1959 by Nellie Swarbrick and Mabel Cranston of the Board of Foreign Missions, and Lillian Wright of the Missionary and Maintenance Department.

39th Henry Hank Torontow Scouts

  • Corporate body

The 39th Scout Pack formed under the leadership of one of Ottawa’s outstanding sportsmen, Jess Abelson. The date was around 1918. “ At the time the Boy Scouts had a Christian religious base and thereby precluded the involvement of Jewish youth. Jess felt that Jewish boys would benefit from the Scouts also, so he formed the 39th - one of the first Jewish scout troops in Canada.” During the period between 1930 and 1960, the 39th had many different leaders including Dr. Abe Slone, Jacob Greenberg, Harold Shaffer, Harold Rubin, Hy Maser, Arnold Borts, Sam Ages and Jack Goldfield. Between 1974 and l989, the scouting movement in the Ottawa Jewish community was inactive. In 1989, it was revitalized by an ardent Scout, Howie Osterer. The 39th was renamed the 39th Henry “Hank” Torontow Scouting Movement to honour Hank Torontow’s “distinguished meritous service as a Director of Scouting between 1957 and l971". Beavers and Cubs had previously been the important areas of continuity and continued to be in the 1990s.

408 Goose Squadron Association

  • Corporate body
  • fi. 2000-2013

The 408 “Goose” Squadron is an Association of retired and serving members of 408 Squadron of the Canadian Forces. The Squadron has a long history and celebrated its 67th anniversary of active service in 2008. The objectives of the Association are laid out in the Constitution and are:

• To sustain and reinforce the maintenance and friendship of former and present squadron members through reunions and other activities,
• To perpetuate the memory of 408 Squadron Members and their exploits, and
• To assist the Commanding Officer of 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron in the execution of his/her duties

426 (Thunderbird) Squadron Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1954-

The 426 “Thunderbird” Squadron Association is composed of retired and serving members of 426 Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Force and Canadian Armed Forces. The unit was formed at Dishforth, Yorkshire, England on the 15 of October 1942 and was officially declared operational on January 11, 1943. The unit participated in Operation HAWK as a part of the USAF Military Air Transport System during the Korean War. As the RCAF’s only long-range transport squadron at the time, the unit initially deployed six aircraft transporting personnel and materiel to Japan to support the United Nations’ efforts. Today the 426 Squadron operates as a training unit in Trenton, Ontario.

4-H Ontario

  • CA
  • Corporate body
  • 1915 -

736 Outreach Corporation (Toronto, Ont.)

  • CAN
  • Corporate body
  • 1986-2017

736 Outreach Corporation was established in 2011. It was an incorporated ministry of the Toronto Conference. The main function of the incorporated ministry was to manage and distribute the funds received from the sale of the Bathurst Street United Church building, formerly the building that was operated and used by the Bathurst Street Centre for Peace and Justice. The Corporation ran a grant program, where finances were distributed in a single payment or in a multi-year programs. The grants were distributed to assist community programs and charitable organizations that fit the mandate of the corporation. Bathurst Street Centre for Justice and Peace was an incorporated ministry of the Toronto South Presbytery. Its purpose was to “continue the development of a climate of partnership in which not-for-profit groups, committed to and acting for social justice and peace, can find solidarity with each other, support from the church and freedom to pursue their own approaches in all their diversity”. During the Toronto Conference presbytery reorganization in 2008 the Centre’s relationship with the Toronto South Presbytery ended and it became an incorporated ministry of Toronto Conference.

A. E. Ames and Co

  • Corporate body

A. E. Ames & Co., founded in 1889, was a brokerage firm based in Toronto, Ontario.

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